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So far Cricket Powder has created 73 blog entries.

The Cricket and Tofu Scramble

Chef: Dr. Aaron T. Dossey Website: www.cricketpowder.com Ingredients: 1 Cup Griopro® Cricket Powder 1/3 cup diced bell peppers 1/2 cup diced tofu 1/3 cup diced onions 1/2 cup chopped kale 2 cups water Olive oil Feta cheese Directions: Sauté onions and peppers with olive oil lightly for a few minutes.   Add the Griopro® Cricket Powder, tofu and water in a non-stick pan at low heat.   Continue mixing and sautéing for [...]

By | November 20th, 2015|Cricket Powder Recipes|0 Comments

Chirpy Chocolate Cricket Powder Brownies

Chef: Havalina Gurevich Website: http://www.hava.biz/blog/eat-some-bugs Ingredients: A box of Brownie Mix and replace 1/4 of the mix with Griopro® Cricket Powder Directions:  Follow the instructions on the box of your choice of Brownie Mix

By | November 20th, 2015|Cricket Powder Recipes|0 Comments

Chirpin’ Cricket Chickpea Fritters

Chef: Havalina Gurevich Website: http://www.hava.biz/blog/eat-some-bugs Ingredients: Buy a package of Falafel mix and replace 1/4 of the mix with Griopro® Cricket Powder Directions:  Follow instructions on the box of Falafel mix and enjoy! Side Note:  I fried mine flat so that I can use less oil

By | November 20th, 2015|Cricket Powder Recipes|0 Comments

Chirpy Banana Cricket Pancakes

Chef: Havalina Gurevich Website: http://www.hava.biz/blog/eat-some-bugs Ingredients: 1/2 cup Griopro® Cricket Powder 1 cup of pancake mix 1 banana  3/4 cup almond milk Directions:  Beat/mix all of the ingredients until smooth  Cook over medium high heat and flip the pancakes once each side is golden brown.

By | November 20th, 2015|Cricket Powder Recipes|0 Comments

Cool Jobs: Finding foods for the future

A reddish-purple seaweed called dulse could be a food of the future. Here it is served in a salad. But fried, it tastes like bacon. Meet dulse, a seaweed with a secret. This translucent red alga grows along northern, rocky coastlines of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. And its colorful, leathery fronds hide a remarkable flavor. When tossed with oil and fried in a pan, they taste like bacon. Read Full Article

By | September 25th, 2015|In The Press|0 Comments